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Education Ambassadors

Meet Our Ambassadors

Wildlife Center if the North Coast is home to non-releasable wildlife ambassadors. Our ambassadors are unable to survive in the wild and now help our community make connections with native animal species. Our ambassadors help visitors respect, care about, and ultimately, desire to protect wildlife and their habitats.

Annual Campaign Cormie

Cormie

Cormie came into care at WCNC in July of 2015, after an Astoria resident witnessed an eagle dropping her into a tree.  Fortunately, this kind individual retrieved her and called the Center.  Her initial assessment revealed respiratory issues, as well as a fracture to her left humerus.  With treatment, her respiratory issues resolved, but the fracture in her wing healed in a way that rendered her unable to fly properly, and therefore not releasable to thrive in the wild.  Just a few weeks old at that time, she was deemed a good candidate for the role of ambassador bird, and she has exceeded all expectations.  Cormie is an eager learner, and the main challenge for her trainers is keeping up with her.  Her quick mind, social nature and joyful demeaner have made her a favorite of volunteers and visitors alike.

Click the button below to watch one of Cormie’s training sessions!

double crested cormorant
double crested cormorant

Cormie came into care at WCNC in July of 2015, after an Astoria resident witnessed an eagle dropping her into a tree.  Fortunately, this kind individual retrieved her and called the Center.  Her initial assessment revealed respiratory issues, as well as a fracture to her left humerus.  With treatment, her respiratory issues resolved, but the fracture in her wing healed in a way that rendered her unable to fly properly, and therefore not releasable to thrive in the wild.  Just a few weeks old at that time, she was deemed a good candidate for the role of ambassador bird, and she has exceeded all expectations.  Cormie is an eager learner, and the main challenge for her trainers is keeping up with her.  Her quick mind, social nature and joyful demeaner have made her a favorite of volunteers and visitors alike.

Click the button below to watch one of Cormie’s training sessions!

Odin

Odin came into care at WCNC in 2014 after being picked up on a road near Astoria.  Her right eye was badly damaged, and it was suspected that she was hit by a car.  Because the vision in her eye would not return and she proved unable to hunt on her own, she was not releasable and was added to our education team. Having been raised in the wild by her parents, Odin is initially shy and uncertain around humans.  She voluntarily participates in daily training sessions with a primary focus on building confidence and trust.  Her favorite things include mice, mealworms, evening baths and foraging for insects.

Click the link below to learn more about Western Screech Owls & download an Odin Coloring Page!

western screech owl

Odin came into care at WCNC in 2014 after being picked up on a road near Astoria.  Her right eye was badly damaged, and it was suspected that she was hit by a car.  Because the vision in her eye would not return and she proved unable to hunt on her own, she was not releasable and was added to our education team. Having been raised in the wild by her parents, Odin is initially shy and uncertain around humans.  She voluntarily participates in daily training sessions with a primary focus on building confidence and trust.  Her favorite things include mice, mealworms, evening baths and foraging for insects.

Click the link below to learn more about Western Screech Owls & download an Odin Coloring Page!

Seabird Display Enclosure

WCNC has been in the planning phase of constructing a new enclosure for Cormie, for a couple of years now & we are so close to reaching our goal.  This new display enclosure will be a huge step for our conservation education program. Help us realize this dream with a donation to our Seabird Display Enclosure!

Wildlife Center of the North Coast's wildlife conservation education program.

Stewardship

Education and engagement of the general public is vital to fostering good stewards of the environment.

Wildlife Center of the North Coast's wildlife conservation education program.

Harmony

Proper education can ultimately lead to a better co-existence with wildlife and their habitats, which would decrease unnecessary harm.

Wildlife Center of the North Coast's wildlife conservation education program.

Service

Wildlife education is an unfilled niche in our community that WCNC has the unique opportunity to fill.

In Memory

american kestrel

In Memory

american kestrel
widgeon

Flynn the American Kestrel and Mama Wigeon the American Wigeon lived at the Wildlife Center until their passing. Both acted as educational ambassadors for their species and provided valuable service to our conservation education program. They are remembered fondly by visitors, volunteers, and staff.

In Memory

american wigeon
american kestrel
Play Video
Watch a training session with Melisa & Cormie!